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Manual Pages  — VINVALBUF

NAME

vinvalbuf – flushes and invalidates all buffers associated with a vnode

CONTENTS

SYNOPSIS

#include <sys/param.h>
#include <sys/vnode.h>

int
vinvalbuf(struct vnode *vp, int flags, struct ucred *cred, int slpflag, int slptimeo);

DESCRIPTION

The vinvalbuf() function invalidates all of the buffers associated with the given vnode. This includes buffers on the clean list and the dirty list. If the V_SAVE flag is specified then the buffers on the dirty list are synced prior to being released. If there is a VM Object associated with the vnode, it is removed.

Its arguments are:
vp
  A pointer to the vnode whose buffers will be invalidated.
flags
  The only supported flag is V_SAVE and it indicates that dirty buffers should be synced with the disk.
cred
  The user credentials that are used to VOP_FSYNC(9) buffers if V_SAVE is set.
slpflag
  The slp flag that will be used in the priority of any sleeps in the function.
slptimeo
  The timeout for any sleeps in the function.

LOCKS

The vnode is assumed to be locked prior to the call and remains locked upon return.

Giant must be held by prior to the call and remains locked upon return.

RETURN VALUES

A 0 value is returned on success.

PSEUDOCODE

vn_lock(devvp, LK_EXCLUSIVE | LK_RETRY);
error = vinvalbuf(devvp, V_SAVE, cred, 0, 0);
VOP_UNLOCK(devvp, 0);
if (error)
        return (error);

ERRORS

[ENOSPC]
  The file system is full. (With V_SAVE)
[EDQUOT]
  Disc quota exceeded. (With V_SAVE)
[EWOULDBLOCK]
  Sleep operation timed out. (See slptimeo)
[ERESTART]
  A signal needs to be delivered and the system call should be restarted. (With PCATCH set in slpflag)
[EINTR]
  The system has been interrupted by a signal. (With PCATCH set in slpflag)

SEE ALSO

tsleep(9), VOP_FSYNC(9)

AUTHORS

This manual page was written by Chad David <Mt davidc@acns.ab.ca>.

VINVALBUF (9) October 20, 2008

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