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Manual Pages  — QUOTAON

NAME

quotaon, quotaoff – turn file system quotas on and off

CONTENTS

SYNOPSIS


quotaon [-g] [-u] [-v] filesystem ...
quotaon [-g] [-u] [-v] -a
quotaoff [-g] [-u] [-v] filesystem ...
quotaoff [-g] [-u] [-v] -a

DESCRIPTION

The quotaon utility announces to the system that disk quotas should be enabled on one or more file systems. The quotaoff utility announces to the system that the specified file systems should have any disk quotas turned off. The file systems specified must have entries in /etc/fstab and be mounted. The quotaon utility expects each file system to have quota files named quota.user and quota.group which are located at the root of the associated file system. These defaults may be overridden in /etc/fstab. By default both user and group quotas are enabled.

Available options:
-a
  If supplied in place of any file system names, Ns will enable/disable all the file systems indicated in /etc/fstab to be read-write with disk quotas. By default only the types of quotas listed in /etc/fstab are enabled.
-g
  Only group quotas listed in /etc/fstab should be enabled/disabled.
-u
  Only user quotas listed in /etc/fstab should be enabled/disabled.
-v
  Cause quotaon and quotaoff to print a message for each file system where quotas are turned on or off.

Specifying both -g and -u is equivalent to the default.

FILES

quota.user at the file system root with user quotas
quota.group
  at the file system root with group quotas
/etc/fstab file system table

SEE ALSO

quota(1), quotactl(2), fstab(5), edquota(8), quotacheck(8), repquota(8)

HISTORY

The quotaon utility appeared in BSD 4.2 .

QUOTAON (8) December 11, 1993

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