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Manual Pages  — BRAND.4TH

NAME

brand.4th – FreeBSD ASCII art boot module

CONTENTS

DESCRIPTION

The file that goes by the name of brand.4th is a set of commands designed to draw the ASCII art BSD brand above the boot loader menu. The commands of brand.4th by themselves are not enough for most uses. Please refer to the examples below for the most common situations, and to loader(8) for additional commands.

Before using any of the commands provided in brand.4th, it must be included through the command:

    include brand.4th

This line is present in the default /boot/menu.rc file, so it is not needed (and should not be re-issued) in a normal setup.

The commands provided by it are:

draw-brand Draws the BSD brand.

The brand that is drawn is configured by setting the loader_brand variable in loader.conf(5) to one of "fbsd" (the default) or "none".

The position of the logo can be configured by setting the loader_brand_x and loader_brand_y variables in loader.conf(5). The default values are 2 (x) and 1 (y).

The environment variables that effect its behavior are:
loader_brand
  Selects the desired brand in the beastie boot menu. Possible values are: "fbsd" (default) or "none".
loader_brand_x
  Sets the desired column position of the brand. Default is 2.
loader_brand_y
  Sets the desired row position of the brand. Default is 1.

FILES

/boot/loader The loader(8).
/boot/brand.4th brand.4th itself.
/boot/loader.rc loader(8) bootstrapping script.

EXAMPLES

Set FreeBSD brand in loader.conf(5):

loader_brand="fbsd"

SEE ALSO

loader.conf(5), loader(8)

HISTORY

The brand.4th set of commands first appeared in FreeBSD 9.0 .

AUTHORS

The brand.4th set of commands was written by Devin Teske <dteske@FreeBSD.org>.

BRAND.4TH (8) May 18, 2011

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